Barbara Adair on The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones

Stewart Home headstand

Stewart Home headstand

“So what is the text about? There is a story; the story is of the life of Ray the Cat Jones. It progresses in a linear fashion, Ray Jones is born to a working family in Wales, and then later, after many adventures, he dies of cancer. Ray Jones is a cat burglar, he is also a victim of the vicious exploiter of the working class, the British bourgeoisie, (and he is Welsh and we all know how the English hate the Welsh -‘sheep shaggers’, so he is a victim of racist bigoted loathing), but he is a righteous man. And so he takes a stand, he is, (becomes) a person of agency, he knows he does not want to die in the coal mines of boredom and pain, so he steals from the rich, why should a ‘toff’ have a full belly and the poor man one groaning in hunger. Furthermore his dreams of one day being a professional boxer are thwarted as, just as he is making it on the boxing circuit, he is set up by some lackeys of the bourgeoisie, (those who are employed to protect wealth and property, uphold unjust laws, those who have ‘sold out’, grassed their spirit to slothful owners), a ‘plod’ (‘rozzer’ ‘old bill’ ‘fuzz’) and so spends time in jai…” Read the full text here: http://sensitiveskinmagazine.com/the-9-lives-of-ray-the-cat-jones-a-novel-by-stewart-home/

Above: Stewart Home doing a headstand in front of one of the 13 pieces by him in the group show In Praise Of Laziness at Trade Gallery in Nottingham on 1 November 2014 at the exhibition opening. Photo by Bruce Asbestos.

 

Loving Dalston on The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones

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“WHO KNOWS the truth about Ray “The Cat” Jones: the world’s most notorious burglar or a small-time jailbird loved by journalists grateful for his exciting yarns about robbing the fabulously rich?

So writer Stewart Home has chosen to tell the master thief’s story as a novel rather than a documentary book.

The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones tells of a Ray Jones, who nearly became world middleweight boxing champion but instead turned into the greatest-ever cat burglar, stealing jewellery from megastars Elizabeth Taylor and Sophia Loren, the private papers of the Duke of Windsor, paintings by Rembrandt and the furs of the London upper-class women, often approached via the rooftops of the Mayfair district.

Ray’s carefully targeted burglaries are perfectly planned and thrillingly executed, as is his jail breakout, one of the most stunning in recent English penal history.

All of the extraordinary incidents figure in the real life of the now-dead (natural causes) Dalstoner…”

Read the full story at Loving Dalston.

Above Stewart Home holds up the special edition (sold out) and ordinary edition of his novel The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones. You can order it online from the publisher Test Centre.

Dennis Cooper on Blood Rites of the Bourgeoisie

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“Blood Rites of the Bourgeoisie is also an anti-novel that travels through the murky terrain of invisible literature. Its author, admired by fellow awkward-squad members Iain Sinclair and Tom McCarthy, has produced an exhilaratingly squalid volume. It is almost wholly bereft of any conventional narrative arc and is best understood as a plunder-text cannibalising and reworking the language of emails, spam and pornographic discourse in the service of a mordant satire of the contemporary art world. It’s unlikely to get its author invited on Start the Week. And yet, while it’s crude, as childish as Viz, and may very well have been slung together over the course of a long weekend, it’s also as funny and as critically incisive a work of para-fiction as I’ve read for some time.” Read the full review here!

Above Stewart Home photographed by Stewart Home on 14 September 2014.

McKenzie Wark on Mandy, Charlie & Mary-Jane

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Mandy, Charlie & Mary-Jane is a either a campus anti-novel or an anti-campus novel, or both. It is an anti-novel in the sense that it has no interest in the novel’s conventions. Characters are mere cyphers. There’s no ‘fine writing’ in its description. The anti-novel is relentless in its refusal of a redemptive dimension to the ‘literary’ as that which sets its petit-bourgeois readers above the world of capital and violence.

It’s fitting then, that its setting is the campus. If the literary was one space of petit-bourgeois redemption, the campus has remained the other. As if by the teaching of culture, a realm of aesthetic contemplation could be carved out of a venal world. Its striking how, in the English context, cultural studies never got that far away from its original impetus in the work of F. R. Leavis. Home’s book is about the death of that impetus, and its replacement by a purely market-based hierarchy of cultural values.

Read the full review here!

Above Stewart Home at Project Number Gallery in London during the Foam exhibition in which he participated.

Spencer Grady On Stewart Home’s Proletarian Post-Modernism Spoken Word Album

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“Word assassin Home bungs up rapid-fire orations with randy readings from past works, frothing up nasal torrents like some a cappella Whitehouse circa Bird Seed… Loki-limpet rants are interspersed with hectic phallocentric headstand hectoring and book-shredding subversion… a sophistic screed from one of his better known works – 69 Things To Do With A Dead Princess (2002) – on Jennifer Lopez’s considerable ass, recalled by a dickless ventriloquist doll locked in a boot of a car, along with various hyperbolic filth scenes, raise wry chuckles from listeners forced to acknowledge the divisions separating the delicate art of pretension from plain pretentious art. You follow?”

Read the full review here!

Above Stewart Home in Arte Studio during the 9th Neoist Festival in Ponte Nossa, Italy, on 4 June 1985.

Paul St John Mackintosh On Stewart Home’s Proletarian Post-Modernism Spoken Word Album

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“I can’t find a single thing to fault in Home’s analysis (emphasis on the anal there, guys), of Martin Amis, Will Self, and much of the supposed New Lad Chic writing of a generation of British writers now well into their later years. “They were backward, stupid, reactionary and posh. The only reason they’re hogging the field is that they all went to the same public schools and university colleges as the people in publishing. But their writing is completely boring and virtually unreadable. Amis is just a right-wing twit, more interested in his teeth than anything else.”

Stewart Home still looks infinitely better than these withering hothouse growths. His promo video for Proletarian Post-Modernism consists basically of a fetish scene with porn star Gina Snake. His tribute to the cult of Diana the Blessed Martyr, 69 Things to Do with a Dead Princess, is published by top Scottish literary house Canongate Books. He does both art and literature “but I’ve had bigger arts prizes than I have literary ones.” What more do you need to know? Isn’t that edgy and stimulating the way that writing is supposed to be?”

Read the full blog post here!

Above Stewart Home selfie in a pair of Hypnotic Action Glasses.

Huw Nesbitt Talks To Stewart Home About Proletarian Post-Modernism & Other Things!

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Stewart Home is a novelist, poet and artist from South London. Since 1988 he has published 32 works of fiction and non-fiction, covering subjects as varied as 20th century Marxism, skinhead culture, continental philosophy and the meaning of sex and death under capitalism.

Existing at the fringes of the mainstream literary world, his novels read like a collision of Jonathan Swift, William Burroughs and Jean-Luc Godard. In 69 Things to Do with a Dead Princess (2002), a suicidal man moves to Aberdeen and investigates a conspiracy theory claiming that Princess Diana’s corpse was dragged around Scottish stone circles until it fell apart; in Down & Out in Shoreditch Hoxton, prostitutes make startling pyscho-geographical discoveries; and in his most recent, Mandy, Charlie & Mary-Jane (2013), he subverts the campus-genre novel and populates it with zombies.

His long writing career hasn’t earned him a place in the literary establishment, but it’s unlikely that he cares. After the publisher of Down & Out went bust, Stewart went on tour, shredding copies and giving readings of the book, one of which is on a new spoken word record, Proletarian Postmodernism. He’s also known as an artist, winning the prestigious Paul Hamlyn Award for visual art last year.

I gave him a call to speak to him about his career and the world.” Read the full piece here!

Above: Stewart Home attempts to get inside his laptop. Photo by Stewart Home’s laptop.