Loving Dalston on The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones

Home9Lives

“WHO KNOWS the truth about Ray “The Cat” Jones: the world’s most notorious burglar or a small-time jailbird loved by journalists grateful for his exciting yarns about robbing the fabulously rich?

So writer Stewart Home has chosen to tell the master thief’s story as a novel rather than a documentary book.

The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones tells of a Ray Jones, who nearly became world middleweight boxing champion but instead turned into the greatest-ever cat burglar, stealing jewellery from megastars Elizabeth Taylor and Sophia Loren, the private papers of the Duke of Windsor, paintings by Rembrandt and the furs of the London upper-class women, often approached via the rooftops of the Mayfair district.

Ray’s carefully targeted burglaries are perfectly planned and thrillingly executed, as is his jail breakout, one of the most stunning in recent English penal history.

All of the extraordinary incidents figure in the real life of the now-dead (natural causes) Dalstoner…”

Read the full story at Loving Dalston.

Above Stewart Home holds up the special edition (sold out) and ordinary edition of his novel The 9 Lives of Ray The Cat Jones. You can order it online from the publisher Test Centre.

Advertisements

Spencer Grady On Stewart Home’s Proletarian Post-Modernism Spoken Word Album

Image

“Word assassin Home bungs up rapid-fire orations with randy readings from past works, frothing up nasal torrents like some a cappella Whitehouse circa Bird Seed… Loki-limpet rants are interspersed with hectic phallocentric headstand hectoring and book-shredding subversion… a sophistic screed from one of his better known works – 69 Things To Do With A Dead Princess (2002) – on Jennifer Lopez’s considerable ass, recalled by a dickless ventriloquist doll locked in a boot of a car, along with various hyperbolic filth scenes, raise wry chuckles from listeners forced to acknowledge the divisions separating the delicate art of pretension from plain pretentious art. You follow?”

Read the full review here!

Above Stewart Home in Arte Studio during the 9th Neoist Festival in Ponte Nossa, Italy, on 4 June 1985.

Paul St John Mackintosh On Stewart Home’s Proletarian Post-Modernism Spoken Word Album

Image

“I can’t find a single thing to fault in Home’s analysis (emphasis on the anal there, guys), of Martin Amis, Will Self, and much of the supposed New Lad Chic writing of a generation of British writers now well into their later years. “They were backward, stupid, reactionary and posh. The only reason they’re hogging the field is that they all went to the same public schools and university colleges as the people in publishing. But their writing is completely boring and virtually unreadable. Amis is just a right-wing twit, more interested in his teeth than anything else.”

Stewart Home still looks infinitely better than these withering hothouse growths. His promo video for Proletarian Post-Modernism consists basically of a fetish scene with porn star Gina Snake. His tribute to the cult of Diana the Blessed Martyr, 69 Things to Do with a Dead Princess, is published by top Scottish literary house Canongate Books. He does both art and literature “but I’ve had bigger arts prizes than I have literary ones.” What more do you need to know? Isn’t that edgy and stimulating the way that writing is supposed to be?”

Read the full blog post here!

Above Stewart Home selfie in a pair of Hypnotic Action Glasses.